Kinetic News October 2016

October 4, 2016

In This Issue:
-Our First Edition!
-Upcoming Events
-Why It Matters


Kinetic News©

Volume 1, Issue 1 – Our First Newsletter! Our Inaugural Issue!

Welcome to the first ever issue of the Kinetic News!

We are actually pretty excited about this. Kinetic Inspection & Testing has been around for a few years now, but beginning in October 2016 the focus of the company is changing.

We are going to be focusing on training, specifically on offering exam preparation and training courses for pressure equipment personnel.

Courses such as:

API 510 Pressure Vessel Inspector Exam Preparation Course

API 570 Piping Inspector Exam Preparation Course

API 653 Above Ground Storage Tank Inspector Exam Preparation Course

CSA W178.2 Code Endorsement Training Courses

Introduction to ASME Code Navigation

Contact us about any of the above courses. Some of these are classroom courses, all of them will be available as self-study courses (for those who cannot get away for a week of training), and we are planning to soon offer online courses! There will be many more courses and offerings coming in the next 12 months!

If your organization has a specific need, custom courses can be designed to meet your personnel’s training needs and experience level. Ask us how! Contact us at [email protected]

 

Upcoming Events

API 510 Pressure Vessel Inspector Exam Preparation Course December 12-17, 2016  - This course includes pre-class work, 6 days of classroom instruction including a guided practice exam, plus a review day prior to exam window.

API 570 Piping Inspector Exam Preparation Course January 9-14, 2017  - This course includes pre-class work, 6 days of classroom instruction including a guided practice exam, plus a review day prior to exam window.

API 653 Above Ground Storage Tank Inspector Exam Preparation Course February 13-18, 2017  - This course includes pre-class work, 6 days of classroom instruction including a guided practice exam, plus a review day prior to exam window.

Contact us regarding these courses, or read about them here.

Why it Matters…

Explosions. Fires. Death, injury and property damage. These are some of the potential results of pressure equipment incidents. Hopefully none of us are ever involved in a serious incident involving pressure equipment, but they do occur. Each month Kinetic News will focus on an experience that highlights why proper training, current certification and knowledgeable personnel matter so much to our daily safety. This section is to give a little back to you, for taking the time to read our newsletter. We really appreciate it! Use this information as the subject of your next toolbox meeting or safety presentation. We hope it is informative.

The setting…

Houston, Texas. December 3, 2004. Marcus Oil and Chemical, a polyethylene wax processing facility.

The incident…

Just before 6 pm on December 3, 2004, a fire and explosion at the Marcus Oil and Chemical processing facility resulted in a three-alarm blaze that firefighters fought for seven hours. The pressure vessel that was the source of the explosion and resulting blaze was a 12-foot diameter, 50-foot-long vessel that weighed approximately 50,000 pounds. The explosion propelled the vessel 150 feet from its installed location to impact into a neighboring warehouse, causing significant structural damage. Debris from the explosion was thrown as far as a quarter-mile from the blast site. Buildings in the area sustained structural damage in a radius of up to a quarter-mile from the explosion, and local residents received minor injuries as a result.

The cause…

After investigation, as is often the case, the cause of the explosion was attributed to a number of things going wrong. But the primary culprit was the work that had been done to install steam pipes inside the vessel. A 24-inch diameter hole had been cut into the head of the vessel, and then re-welded into place. The flame cut hole was not ground, cleaned or prepared for welding. The weld that was made was not a full penetration weld, in fact the plate was fused less than 25% through the thickness of the plate. No in-process inspection was made, and the weld contained excessive porosity. The welder was not qualified, and there was no qualified weld procedure specification used for the welding of the plate. No hydrotest was carried out after welding prior to the vessel being put back in service. To top it all off, there was no pressure-relieving device on the vessel or system.

The lesson…

The work that was done on this vessel was not designed, executed or inspected according to the rules of ASME Section VIII-1 or the repair rules of the NBIC. No repair procedure, welding procedure, qualified welder or knowledgeable inspector was used in the process. Fortunately, no one was killed, but the incident could have been avoided with proper understanding of the pressure equipment, and what altering the pressure retaining capabilities would potentially do.

Incidents like this are why pressure equipment inspectors receive training. To avoid potentially fatal accidents and make sure  that jurisdictional and code requirements are met and sound engineering practices can be followed, make sure your company is trained properly. Contact Kinetic Inspection & Testing today!

The complete report of this incident is available here.

Thanks for reading!

Todd Smith

Please feel free to forward this newsletter to anyone who might find it useful. If this newsletter was forwarded to you, and you would like to subscribe to more, click here and enter your email.